Tag Archives: failed the ufe

The post UFE-results experience, from an “experienced writer”

Hi readers!  My name is Gus Patel, and I have offered to help with updates to content on the UFE Blog.  I have recently been in your situation, having written the 2013 UFE.  Currently, I work as an Audit Senior at BDO Canada LLP.  In my spare time, I enjoy being active, as well as teaching students about accounting concepts.

Last Thursday and Friday were the days.

They were the days you’ve been waiting 12 weeks for. After writing, what might possibly be one of the most challenging and mentally exhausting exams of your life, it’s finally UFE results day.  You are anxious, quivering nervous excitement, hoping desperately to see your name on the UFE results page.  As it gets closer to the final hour your heart beats as you constantly refresh the main results page at 12:00 sharp in Ontario.  You quickly scroll through the page, not finding your name through a quick glance, you decide to look up and down the page, but your name is not there….  You sit back like you just hit a brick wall, and you get that deep sinking feeling in your stomach. I failed the UFE!  

Sorry, I know that was a bit dramatic, but for some people it is not too far from how you’re feeling, trust me – I was in that situation too.  Your mind often has a way of hyping a situation to always be the “be-all-and-end-all” situation.  That if you don’t pass the UFE the first time, that the world will be over.  It may feel that way at first, but at some point you’ll come to realize that it was just an exam (maybe not just any exam).

Looking back on the experience, I think the hardest thing to me was looking my eager friends, family, and my girlfriend, who were also anxiously waiting for me to tell them that I had passed, that I didn’t.  Of course, then there is that awkward moment where they stumble to try and find their words to console you.  I think the last thing any writer who doesn’t make it through the process wants to hear is, “Don’t worry – you’ll study hard and do it again next time”.  Not a lot of people can understand what you went through.  On a positive note, hopefully soon after, you will run into a successful repeat writers, perhaps several in your office – they will reach out to you in understanding support.  Actually, looking back I was really surprised by how many people did reach out to me, even being at one of the Big-4 firms.

The first thing to get into your head is, it does happen, people can be unsuccessful the first time, or even the second or third time writing, you can fail this exam.  The Board of Evaluator’s objective is designed to do just that!  It doesn’t mean that you can’t do it.  If you get the UFE Success book by Densmore (which I strongly suggest you do at some point) it has some strong statistics, “… the flow-through rates (of the UFE) are as high as 99% in ASCA, are averaging around 97% in British Columbia and have historically been around 94% in Ontario but are rising. These statistics demonstrate that experienced writers can, and are, making it through the system. Passing the UFE is a very achievable goal.”  If nothing else, keep that in your head.  You can pass.

As for now, if you have just found out that you had an unsuccessful attempt, do not fret – it’s okay in the moment to feel upset, angry, emotional… it’s part of being human, but do not let it consume you.  I am a strong believer that things do happen for a reason, and coincidentally enough, there is always a reason behind why you didn’t pass.  It wasn’t an anomaly I can assure you of that.

You have questions, I know you do.  Luckily for you, I’ve been through this process once –  I was very meticulous in my second attempt in trying to reach at every possible resource in order to gain an advantage along my 2nd attempt, and I want to pass every bit of it to you.  Like I said, you can do this – if you really want to.  Looking back on it a year later, believe it or not, it is somewhat of a blessing in disguise because it will make you a stronger person.

However, do not fret about any of it for now.  First order of business I want you to do is nothing.  When I say nothing, I mean it – keep your head out of the UFE game, it is of ultimate priority that you rest and recover so that you can hit next year ready to attack.  Your goal in the next little while is reach to your friends and loved ones for support, get past the feeling of depression, self pity and doubt, and relax and forget all about this process.  Have fun again and enjoy the holidays, and don’t even think about the UFE until the beginning of next year.

There are more resources than ever today for repeat writers. Don’t worry, UFE Blog will be right here, helping along the way.

A note from Tom, the UFE Blogger:

I want to personally congratulate Gus, who I’ve worked with for some part of this year. I was nervous to be one of the people clicking refresh on the results page at 12 noon. I was even more thrilled to see Gus’ name there shortly after. I’m happy to bring Gus’ voice, as an experienced writer, to this blog and I hope that the many candidates that must write the UFE a second or third time benefit from his experience and support. Congratulations Gus!

The post UFE-results experience, from an "experienced writer"

Hi readers!  My name is Gus Patel, and I have offered to help with updates to content on the UFE Blog.  I have recently been in your situation, having written the 2013 UFE.  Currently, I work as an Audit Senior at BDO Canada LLP.  In my spare time, I enjoy being active, as well as teaching students about accounting concepts.

Last Thursday and Friday were the days.

They were the days you’ve been waiting 12 weeks for. After writing, what might possibly be one of the most challenging and mentally exhausting exams of your life, it’s finally UFE results day.  You are anxious, quivering nervous excitement, hoping desperately to see your name on the UFE results page.  As it gets closer to the final hour your heart beats as you constantly refresh the main results page at 12:00 sharp in Ontario.  You quickly scroll through the page, not finding your name through a quick glance, you decide to look up and down the page, but your name is not there….  You sit back like you just hit a brick wall, and you get that deep sinking feeling in your stomach. I failed the UFE!  

Sorry, I know that was a bit dramatic, but for some people it is not too far from how you’re feeling, trust me – I was in that situation too.  Your mind often has a way of hyping a situation to always be the “be-all-and-end-all” situation.  That if you don’t pass the UFE the first time, that the world will be over.  It may feel that way at first, but at some point you’ll come to realize that it was just an exam (maybe not just any exam).

Looking back on the experience, I think the hardest thing to me was looking my eager friends, family, and my girlfriend, who were also anxiously waiting for me to tell them that I had passed, that I didn’t.  Of course, then there is that awkward moment where they stumble to try and find their words to console you.  I think the last thing any writer who doesn’t make it through the process wants to hear is, “Don’t worry – you’ll study hard and do it again next time”.  Not a lot of people can understand what you went through.  On a positive note, hopefully soon after, you will run into a successful repeat writers, perhaps several in your office – they will reach out to you in understanding support.  Actually, looking back I was really surprised by how many people did reach out to me, even being at one of the Big-4 firms.

The first thing to get into your head is, it does happen, people can be unsuccessful the first time, or even the second or third time writing, you can fail this exam.  The Board of Evaluator’s objective is designed to do just that!  It doesn’t mean that you can’t do it.  If you get the UFE Success book by Densmore (which I strongly suggest you do at some point) it has some strong statistics, “… the flow-through rates (of the UFE) are as high as 99% in ASCA, are averaging around 97% in British Columbia and have historically been around 94% in Ontario but are rising. These statistics demonstrate that experienced writers can, and are, making it through the system. Passing the UFE is a very achievable goal.”  If nothing else, keep that in your head.  You can pass.

As for now, if you have just found out that you had an unsuccessful attempt, do not fret – it’s okay in the moment to feel upset, angry, emotional… it’s part of being human, but do not let it consume you.  I am a strong believer that things do happen for a reason, and coincidentally enough, there is always a reason behind why you didn’t pass.  It wasn’t an anomaly I can assure you of that.

You have questions, I know you do.  Luckily for you, I’ve been through this process once –  I was very meticulous in my second attempt in trying to reach at every possible resource in order to gain an advantage along my 2nd attempt, and I want to pass every bit of it to you.  Like I said, you can do this – if you really want to.  Looking back on it a year later, believe it or not, it is somewhat of a blessing in disguise because it will make you a stronger person.

However, do not fret about any of it for now.  First order of business I want you to do is nothing.  When I say nothing, I mean it – keep your head out of the UFE game, it is of ultimate priority that you rest and recover so that you can hit next year ready to attack.  Your goal in the next little while is reach to your friends and loved ones for support, get past the feeling of depression, self pity and doubt, and relax and forget all about this process.  Have fun again and enjoy the holidays, and don’t even think about the UFE until the beginning of next year.

There are more resources than ever today for repeat writers. Don’t worry, UFE Blog will be right here, helping along the way.

A note from Tom, the UFE Blogger:

I want to personally congratulate Gus, who I’ve worked with for some part of this year. I was nervous to be one of the people clicking refresh on the results page at 12 noon. I was even more thrilled to see Gus’ name there shortly after. I’m happy to bring Gus’ voice, as an experienced writer, to this blog and I hope that the many candidates that must write the UFE a second or third time benefit from his experience and support. Congratulations Gus!

So you think you failed the UFE – 2013 edition

For days..err…weeks after the UFE is finished one of the most popular searches that lands people here is something related to failing the UFE.

1 i think i failed the ufe
2 failed the ufe
3 i failed you + blog
4 i think i failed the 2012 ufe
5 i think i failed the ufe 2012
6 think i failed ufe
7 thought i failed the ufe for sure
8 ufe exam 2012 failed
9 what i can do after failed ufe

Certainly group #7 there is quite sure of themselves! Group #3 is probably not UFE related so not sure why they’re coming here. Group #9 may already be studying for the next UFE.

If you’re one of those in this year’s bunch who thinks they failed the UFE with a variety of levels of certainty, you’re not alone. I poke fun a little above but I get that this is a challenging time for many whose futures may rely on this. A lot of people feel this way after the UFE. Even Gold Medallists feel this way sometimes after the UFE. It may be the biggest exam of your life and it’s normal to feel like you blew it. 

I wrote about this last year so please go check it out. The advice stands for this year’s writers. Hang in there.

If any previous UFE writers have any tips for this year’s cohort on getting through the next few months please do share!

UFE 2013 – Tuesday

Congratulations on finishing the first day of the 2013 UFE!

I hope you stuck to my advice and avoided all talk of the UFE afterwards. Be sure to keep that going until you’re done on Thursday.

Don’t worry if you feel awful.  Even Gold Medallists feel this way sometimes. The key is to remember that each day is worth about 1/3 of the marks so you’ve still go plenty of roadway ahead to do well. Just about everyone feels not so great after leaving the UFE.

Hang in there, enjoy your evening, get lots of sleep and back full force and confident tomorrow! Good luck!

Help for Experienced Writers

Helping experienced writers is something I struggle with because it’s difficult to give good advice if I haven’t lived the situation. I’ve had writers come to me and ask me what they should be doing right now. Should they be writing one case a week or two? Should they be only studying technical or should they be writing cases, too?

The truth is there are no easy answers. It depends on why you didn’t pass the previous time(s), how you study best, what your strengths and weaknesses are and a host of other possible reasons. A lot of people think there is some magic path to success – if only they do x cases, or if they study in this specific way – it will work. Of course, everyone probably knows deep down it can’t be that easy. Not everyone fits neatly on the UFE path.

So my advice to you is this:

Take time to honestly reflect on what the problems are.

  • Did you fall into the trap of too much technical at the expense of writing cases? Or maybe the opposite is true.
  • Did you study alone, or with a study group that didn’t work for you?
  • Did you not study enough or too much (be careful here!)
  • Did you allocate time correctly on the exam? Or did you not manage time well? Or the host of other technical reasons that can exist.
  • What were the problems on your mock cases prior to the exam?
  • Is it a language, communication or writing problem?

As you can see, the list can be long. Each varying answer can lead to a different suggestion. I think the best thing you can do is do an honest assessment and focus on the factors which hurt you last time.

The answer may be a great place to start in making changes to your 2013 strategy.

This may mean taking a repeat writers’ course out there or reading a book. Or maybe you need something more individual such as a tutor, one of the smaller programs out there or just a really good study partner.

Given how much time, effort and money goes into the UFE I think it’s worth investing in this activity as well as in a solution suitable to you. We’ll be around here to keep offering help and advice, too.

But as I said above, I’m not a repeat writers. If you are or have been, please drop us a line in the comments and let us know what you did and why. I know there are many that would benefit here just to know they’re not alone.

UFE Podcast for second time writers

Saw that over on CA Accounting Designation Revealed, they’ve got a Podcast up of an interview with Kayla Switzer discussing everything UFE for experienced writers. It sounds like a good listen for anyone rewriting the UFE this year so head on over and check it out!

What is your weakness? Know what your transcript is saying!

Today we have a guest post from Kayla Switzer’s Blog: I Failed the UFE! Now What? You can also get in touch through her web site at www.KaylaSwitzer.comFeel free to contact Kayla if you have any questions or just want to vent! 

Knowing why you failed the UFE is an important first step in moving on. I have been receiving a lot of emails from students requesting an explanation of their transcript because they are confused about what exactly it is saying. It is confusing! So let’s go through a sample in more detail and you can use it as a guide to understand your transcript better.

Transcript Sample

This is an example of a student who failed at Level 1. The sufficiency grouping of 1 means that this student was close to passing the UFE, but needed one or two more indicators at Competent to pass. A student with a sufficiency grouping of 10, which is the highest sufficiency grouping (i.e. the furthest away from passing Level 1) would have needed several more indicators at C to pass.

The decile rankings for the Comprehensive and the Non-Comprehensives are to rank you against your peers for the three day exam. In this example, the student has a decile ranking of 7 on the Comprehensive and 8 in the Non-Comprehensive (the multis), which means that the student was was in the bottom 30% on the Comprehensive and the bottom 20% for the multis. Another way to look at it is that the honour roll students would have a decile ranking of 1, which means they would be in the top 10% of all writers.

In this example, this student passed at Level 2 and Level 3. This student only barely passed Tax at “standard marginally met”. This could mean that the student was weak in tax technical, that they didn’t notice an entire tax indicator, or maybe that the student had poor time management and always left tax to the end and didn’t tend to provide enough depth.

There is also a lot of reading between the lines to do. For example, did you focus primarily on the Level 2 requirements getting green, and then got yellow and red in Level 3? This is a time management issue because although of course you need to do well in PM and Assurance, if you don’t leave enough time for Level 3 you won’t be able to pass the UFE.

So now look at your own transcript. What is it saying? What level did you fail at? How many reds and yellows did you get? Can you read between the lines to find out what it all really means?

If you have more questions on your specific transcript please feel free to contact me through my website at www.KaylaSwitzer.com. I love to hear from all of you!

UFE 2012 Results November 30 – Let's hear some opinions

With the UFE results now less than a month away I’ve no doubt that it’ll begin to weigh heavily on a lot of minds as the days tick by. This is normal and unfortunately part of the process.

Over a month has passed since your wrote, your papers are now marked and the Board of Evaluators is probably reviewing the overall results and making a lot of decisions. I hope this time has allowed you to have some “sober second thought” about your performance and I’m putting up a little opinion section below where you can share your thoughts on UFE 2012 if you want. One of the things candidates are most frequently looking for on here is other people’s opinions about UFE 2012 so here’s your chance to share and lend support for those that would like to. Vote below and then join us on the Facebook group for more discussion throughout November leading up to the results. Hang in there, almost through it.

[socialpoll id=”2543″]

UFE 2012 Results November 30 – Let’s hear some opinions

With the UFE results now less than a month away I’ve no doubt that it’ll begin to weigh heavily on a lot of minds as the days tick by. This is normal and unfortunately part of the process.

Over a month has passed since your wrote, your papers are now marked and the Board of Evaluators is probably reviewing the overall results and making a lot of decisions. I hope this time has allowed you to have some “sober second thought” about your performance and I’m putting up a little opinion section below where you can share your thoughts on UFE 2012 if you want. One of the things candidates are most frequently looking for on here is other people’s opinions about UFE 2012 so here’s your chance to share and lend support for those that would like to. Vote below and then join us on the Facebook group for more discussion throughout November leading up to the results. Hang in there, almost through it.

[socialpoll id=”2543″]

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